Swords and Shovels: Game Managers, Loaders, and the Game Loop

Unity is one of the most common game engines today. This course will help you expand your programming knowledge and game development skills by teaching you how to build systems common to video games and integrate them into existing projects.
Course info
Rating
(42)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 11, 2018
Duration
2h 4m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(42)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 11, 2018
Duration
2h 4m
Description

Games are complicated systems with lots of moving parts and interconnected components. In this course, Swords and Shovels: Game Managers, Loaders, and the Game Loop, you will learn how to implement tools to manage these complications as you build larger projects. First, you will learn about Game Managers, their purpose, and how they can improve the flow and development process of a game. Next, you will explore how to load and unload additional assets as a game progresses. Finally, you will discover how to manage game state and use it to control sub-systems in an organized manner. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge necessary to build games of substantial size and complexity.

About the author
About the author

Jon McElroy is a game developer and graphics programmer with a decade of experience in the games industry. He has spent time working on both indie and AAA titles at companies like EA, Sony and Funomena and now, in addition to games, spends time researching rendering and computer vision.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Jon McElroy. Welcome to my course, Swords and Shovels: Game Managers, Loaders and the Game Loop. I'm an independent graphics programmer with over a decade of experience working in games. Unity is currently one of the most popular game engines in the world. This course expands on the Swords and Shovels series and expects some basic programming and Unity experience. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include building a centralized game manager, managing scene loading and unloading, using game state to track and control game behavior, properly restarting and shutting down a game. By the end of the course, you'll know more about how to build the complex systems that games need and make them manageable enough to expand effectively. From here, continuing your learning by diving further into the Swords and Shovels series with courses on inventory or combat. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn more about game development in Unity with the Swords and Shovels: Game Managers, Loaders and the Game Loop course, at Pluralsight.