Play by Play: Developing Microservices and Mobile Apps with JHipster

In this course, you’ll learn how to build a microservices architecture with JHipster.
Course info
Rating
(15)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 30, 2018
Duration
2h 17m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction to Microservices
Microservices with JHipster
Deploy to the Cloud
Developing Mobile Apps with JHipster
What’s Next for JHipster?
Description
Course info
Rating
(15)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 30, 2018
Duration
2h 17m
Description

Play by Play is a series in which top technologists work through a problem in real time, unrehearsed, and unscripted. In this course, Play by Play: Developing Microservices and Mobile Apps with JHipster, Matt Raible and Michael Hoffman demonstrate building a microservices architecture with JHipster. Learn how to generate a gateway (powered by Netflix Zuul), a microservice (that talks to MongoDB), Docker Compose, and deploy to Minikube and Google Cloud using Kubernetes. By the end of this course, you’ll have all the tools necessary to build and deploy a microservices architecture with Jhipster.

About the author
About the author

Matt Raible is a well-known figure in the Java community and has been building web applications for most of his adult life. For over 20 years, he has helped developers learn and adopt open source frameworks and use them effectively. He's a web developer, Java Champion, and Developer Advocate at Okta.

About the author

Michael is a Senior Technical Architect at NVISIA. He's worked in technology for almost twenty years for a variety of clients across several different industries. He has a great passion for teaching and mentoring.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Matt Raible, and welcome to my course, Play by Play Developing Microservice and Mobile Apps with JHipster. I'm a web developer, Java champion, and developer advocate at Okta. JHipster is a nifty application generator that's become a full-stack development platform for generating, developing, and deploying Spring Boot plus Angular or React web apps and microservices. Even if you don't use JHipster to develop new apps with, it contains a plethora of useful patterns that you can use for your existing projects. In this course, you are going to learn how to develop microservices with Spring Boot and Spring Cloud. Then you'll see how to generate the same architecture with JHipster. Some of the major topics that we will cover include microservices and when to use them, OAuth 2. 0 and OpenID Connect, progressive web applications, JHipster Cloud deployment options, and using Ionic with JHipster for mobile application development. By the end of this course, you'll know how to use JHipster to generate a microservices architecture and deploy it to the cloud. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with Java and npm. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn JHipster with this Play by Play course about how to develop microservices and mobile apps with JHipster at Pluralsight.

Deploy to the Cloud
So deploying to the cloud obviously is the thing to do these days, right? It's where you want to be. It's one of the happiest places on Earth if you can be in production there. And basically, this is a subset of how you can deploy JHipster. It supports Heroku, Cloud Foundry, AWS, and Google Cloud. These are just the best known cloud providers in my opinion. There's many other options you can use. Even Google App Engine, they recently added support for Java 8, which means Spring Boot will now work. And since this is just a Spring Boot app, it can be deployed, you know, anywhere.

Developing Mobile Apps with JHipster
Great, alright. Well I guess we've deployed, we've gone through this whole microservice implementation. We're going to get into mobile now? Yes. Awesome. So JHipster supports basically Angular and it's responsive and it uses Bootstrap, right, so it'll work great on a mobile device, but there's also this Ionic thing.