Program Management: Identifying Your Objectives

For your program to be successful you have to understand the needs you are trying to fill. This course will teach you how to design a program that fills your organization's needs and will put you on your way to earning your PMI PgMP® certification.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 10, 2017
Duration
2h 13m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 10, 2017
Duration
2h 13m
Description

Have you had success delivering individual projects for your organization, but now you're ready to make the jump to delivering an entire program? In this course, Program Management: Identifying Your Objectives, you'll learn fundamental knowledge to assess the strategic needs of your organization so you can design programs that will fill those needs effectively. First, you'll learn how to interpret your organization's vision and strategy so you can understand where your program fits into that strategy. Next, you'll explore how to complete critical program planning activities, such as defining a program plan, creating a program roadmap, and writing a program charter to ensure that your program gets off on the right foot. Finally, you'll cover how to identify the benefits that your program will deliver, and estimate both the financial and non-financial values of each benefit so your organization can better understand its expected return on its investment in your program. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge of program management necessary to properly assess your organizational needs, and enabling you to design a program that fills those needs for your organization.

About the author
About the author

Jeremy Jarrell is an agile coach and author who helps teams get better at doing what they love. He is heavily involved in the technology community, both as a highly rated speaker throughout the United States.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Jeremy Jarrell and welcome to my course PgMP - Identifying Your Objectives. I'm a Pluralsight author and mentor who helps teams deliver great products. Are you considering pursuing PMIs, PgMP certification? Or are you a program manager who wants to better understand how your program can fit into your organization's strategic plan? In this course we are going to learn how to thoroughly understand your organization's vision and strategy so you can better design a program that fully contributes to that strategy. Some of the major topics that we will cover include how to assess the needs of your organization so you can better understand how your program can fill those needs, how to create a compelling business case that will win further investment in your program from your organization, how to develop a well defined program plan, road map, and charter that would demonstrate you've invested the proper level of planning into your program, as well as how to understand the benefits that the successful delivery of your program will yield to your organization. And you'll learn what to expect if you're considering pursuing PMI's PgMP certification to further your career. By the end of this course you'll understand how to create an initial plan for the execution of your program as well as be well on your way to preparing for PMI's PgMP certification. Before beginning this course you should be familiar with basic project management concepts and practices, such as those practices often discussed in association with PMI's PgMP certification. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn how to assess your organizational needs with the PgMP -Identifying Your Objectives course at Pluralsight.

Creating a Compelling Business Case
My name is Jeremy Jarrell and welcome to Creating a Compelling Business Case, part of the PgMP Identifying Your Objectives course of the PMI PgMP learning path. In this module you'll learn how to create a compelling business case for your program, as well as what level of detail is appropriate for that business case at this stage in your program lifecycle. Earning approval for your program starts with a strong business case, as any program must deliver something of value to the sponsoring organization to be successful. This is because without a strong value proposition, the program isn't likely to win funding and support from stakeholders in the first place. Now how do you convince your stakeholders of the value your program has to offer? You do so with a strong business case. A strong business case clearly illustrates the problem that the program intends to solve, gives a high level overview of the approach that the program will use to solve that problem, and paints a clear pictures of the benefit to the organization of solving the problem. When executed well, all of these elements work together to put you on your way to building the support that you need to win authorization for your program. In this module we'll see Chris and Susan collaborate on the business case for their program in an effort to gain the steering committee's support for further investment.

Creating Your Program Charter
My name is Jeremy Jarrell and welcome to Creating Your Program Charter, part of the PgMP Identifying Your Objective course of the PMI PgMP learning path. In this module you'll learn how to summarize all of your planning activities in a way that can be easily consumed by your steering committee, and what elements of a program charter are necessary to demonstrate that you've thoroughly considered all of the dimensions of your program. The program charter is often the last step in an organization's stage-gate process before a program may be authorized for execution. While some elements of the program charter are new, much of the information will be familiar from the program's business case, mission, road map, and the other earlier program planning activities that you've already performed. In fact, you can consider the program charter to be the culmination of your earlier planning, since this document draws so many elements from earlier artifacts, but also attempts to connect the dots between those artifacts. But beyond simply restating and summarizing your earlier work, successful program charters not only link the charter back to your earlier planning, but they also connect your charter forward to your organization's strategic priorities. Properly linking the program to an organization's strategic objectives and initiatives can dramatically improve the odds of a program's authorization since this will better illustrate to the organization how your program contributes to that organization's broader vision and strategy.