Description
Course info
Rating
(162)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 7, 2016
Duration
1h 58m
Description

In this course, Introduction to Networking for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105, you will examine how basic human communication, like talking in person or on the phone, contains the same fundamental concepts used in moving data across a network. First, you will learn how to examine communication, and determine how to dissect it into components so it can be individually categorized and described. Next, you will learn how to break down communication into components, which will be of great benefit when understanding data networking, as there are many simple protocols which interact in complex ways. To accomplish this you will learn the TCP/IP and OSI models of networking, encapsulation, addressing, as well as what is called "chunks of information" at different points in the communication process. Finally you'll learn about the history and the birth of high speed data communications. By the end of this course, you'll know the OSI Model, TCP/IP Model, and you'll have an understanding of what encapsulation is as it relates to data networking.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course, Introduction to Networking for the CCNA 200-125 and 100-105 exams. I'm a network engineer and instructor at Madison College in Madison, Wisconsin, and I'm proud to be a Pluralsight author as well. Data networking is a mysterious topic full of strange language, concepts, and ideas that are all interconnected in a seemingly unusual way. However, once we understand how to break down communication into its fundamental components, it becomes substantially easier to understand, and it actually becomes pretty cool. In this course we're going to dissect how humans communicate, and introduce an organizational system to make all future understanding of data networking operation much easier. Some of the major topics we will cover are dissecting human communication, talking, into fundamental components, and we'll compare those components to similar components in data networking. We'll also examine networking models used to categorize networking components, and briefly examine the history and the birth of high-speed data communications. By the end of this course, you'll know the OSI Model, TCP/IP Model, and have an understanding of what encapsulation is, as it relates to data networking. Before beginning this course, you just need a desire to learn data networking and an open mind about how it actually happens. From here you should feel comfortable diving into data networking with courses on Network Layer Addressing for the CCNA exam, which is the very next course after this one. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn data networking with the Introduction to Networking for the CCNA 200-125 and 100-105 course at Pluralsight.

Dissecting Communication
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes, this is Introduction to Networking. This course, in addition to helping you understand the concepts of data networking in general, will also get you prepped to take the Cisco CCNA exam. These exams are numbered 200-125 and 100-105 for the ICND1 exam. I'll talk all about these exams at the end of this course, but for now I want to move on to the meat and potatoes of data networking and look at how we dissect communication into components so that we can better understand it. Data networking, in my opinion, is actually quite simple. However, I'll qualify that and say that it's simple in its individual components. It is very complex when we connect all of these individual components together. So what we need is we need a method for understanding, and dissecting, and looking at each of those individual components. So what I want to do here is identify the components of communication that we use in our day-to-day life, so that we can use that as an analogy to see how that works in data networking. We're going to categorize each component, we're going to see how protocols emerge from these categories, and then we're going to look and see how the protocols and models can be used to better understand how networking works.

Network Communication Models
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes, this is Introduction to Networking for the Cisco CCNA, the 200-125 and 100-105 exams. These exams cover the CCNA and ICND1 exam respectively. I will talk all about these exams at the very end of this course, right now let's move into Network Communication Models so we can continue the conversation we started with the previous module. Our goals this module are to map our communication dissection that we did last module to data networking communications. I want to use that as a launching pad then to talk about the OSI model and the TCP/IP model for network communication organization. These are literally critical in understanding how networking works, and I want to give you as much information as I can so that you can make use of these models to understand data networking.

Encapsulation
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes, this is Introduction to Networking for the Cisco CCNA 200-125 and 100-105 exams, those are the CCNA exam and the ICND1 exam respectively. I'll talk all about those Cisco certification exams at the end of this introduction to networking course, for now let's talk about the real meat and potatoes of data networking, which is Encapsulation. So far up to this point I've been giving you a lot of definitions for a lot of words, I've been trying to compare it to something in real life, like having a conversation with our friend, or Homer meeting Marge and calling her up, and using that to build some models so that we can understand better how data communication works in networking. So what I'm going to do here is start off by reexamining that OSI model that we've looked at in the previous two modules here. I want to introduce the concept of data encapsulation. I've kind of teased this in the last video when we looked at how messages get addressed and moved across a network. In this module we're going to take that to the next step. I want to identify the names of data chunks. These are very important, they're very precise names, they have very precise meanings. And when we use these precise names to identify the components that we're looking at in data networking, we're much better off being able to communicate with others, as well as have a really solid understanding of how data is organized when we're sending it across a network.

Data Networks and Addressing
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes, this is Introduction to Networking for the CCNA, and this module is Data Networks and Addressing. Addressing data networks is a very fundamental concept in data networking, and understanding it will make everything easier to understand long term. We have addresses at multiple layers, like we've seen already. We have local, a local address, that was our name, or in the case of networking it was Ethernet and the MAC address. We had our global area, or our network layer, where we had a telephone number in conversational land, and we had an IP address in networking land. So let's go take a deeper look at these. Our goals this module are to look at addressing at the data link layer, so we're going to take a look at a MAC address. We're then going to look at addressing at the network layer, and identify IP address components. At last, we're going to examine a home network. I've built a home network here in my lab, very similar to what you might have at your house, so what I'm encouraging people to do is take a look at how things are set up in their home networks.

Cisco Certifications
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes, this is Introduction to Networking for the Cisco CCNA 200-125 and 100-105 exams, those are the CCNA exam and the ICND1 exam respectively, and this module is specifically focused on Cisco Certifications. Our goals this module are to talk about the different levels of certification Cisco offers, as well as the certifications offered at each level. We'll talk about the specific exams required for the CCENT, or the c-cent, and the CCNA exams. Now this series of courses is specifically covering topic for the CCENT and CCNA exam. And we'll wrap up with some of the prep materials you need to study for and pass the CCNA, as well as any lab equipment that you might be interested in, including the lab equipment that I'm going to be using in my own lab for this entire video series.