Network Layer Addressing and Operation for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105

In this course, we will walk through the essentials of an IP address and then take a deep dive into subnetting IPv4 networks into smaller networks, as well as learn IPv6 addressing and how we can divide the very large IPv6 address space into smaller subnets.
Course info
Rating
(106)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 12, 2016
Duration
3h 48m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction to Binary
Introduction to IP Addressing
Introduction to Subnetting
Subnetting Examples
Introduction to IPv6
IPv6 Subnetting
Router Operation
Variable Length Subnet Masking (VLSM)
Check Your Knowledge
Description
Course info
Rating
(106)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 12, 2016
Duration
3h 48m
Description

As early as 1985, engineers knew there would be a shortage of IPv4 addresses before the end of the century. Over the next decade, engineers found a very clever solution to the problem, however it created a complex address. This course will go into extreme detail to describe the structure of an IPv4 address and its subnet mask counterpart. To do this, understanding binary numbers becomes very important. We will describe how binary numbers work, how to convert from decimal to binary and back again, as well as see how hexadecimal easily integrates into binary. This may sound daunting, however, we keep the content simple and easy to follow, so it is not overwhelming. After understanding binary and the structure of an IPv4 address, we will examine how to break a single IPv4 network into multiple IPv4 networks, understand the definition of a network address, broadcast address, and a host address. We will the examine how to calculate networks more efficiently using Variable Length Subnet Masking(VLSM), and to wrap up IPv4 addressing, we will take a simple IPv4 network, break it into 2 networks, and then observe its behavior across a router. Once we wrap up IPv4, we move into IPv6, and explain the nuances of this new and obscure looking address. We keep it as simple as possible, so you understand the structure and operation of the IP address, without getting bogged down in nuanced details, infrequently used in IPv6. We will wrap up IPv6 by learning how IPv6 networks are distributed to ISPs, customers, and finally customer sites.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course, Network Layer addressing. I am a network engineer with 20 years professional experience managing enterprise networks and educating people about them. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include how to convert binary numbers to decimal numbers to hexadecimal numbers and back again. We'll learn the structure of an IPv4, an IPv6 address and identify the different address types for each protocol. We'll learn how to use the subnet mask to identify IP address types, as well as how to break up big IP networks into smaller ones using subnetting. Before beginning the course, you should be eager and ready to understand the mathematics behind IP addressing without the fear of being overwhelmed by mathematics. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn subnetting with the network layer addressing course at Pluralsight.

Introduction to Binary
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Network Layer Addressing for the Cisco CCNA 200-125 Exam and the 100-105 Exam. That's the CCNA exam and the CCENT exam or the ICND 1 exam respectively. Now if you want to learn more about those exams, in the last module of Introduction to Networking for this series, I go through all of the exams and numbers and what they mean. For now, let's move into this network layer addressing and talk about binary. Our goals this module are to introduce the need for binary numbering, we'll review some primary school math just to get you thinking in terms that make it much easier to understand how binary counting works, and then we'll move into counting in binary. We'll then convert binary numbers to decimal numbers, and decimal numbers back to binary numbers. We're going to end this module with hexadecimal. All of these things are going to prepare you for the upcoming sections, which are all about IP addresses in data networking. Let's get started.

Introduction to IP Addressing
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and this is Introduction to IP Addressing. Our goals in this module are specifically to focus on what is an IPv4 address and what are the components that make it up. We're also going to look at the distinction between classful addresses and classless addressing. We'll look at the different types of addresses that we need to know to understand how networks operate. So we're getting a bit of a vocabulary lesson in this module. We're going to look at some special addresses that we have to consider, and then we'll wrap it up with a demonstration so that we can see how the rules of IP addressing are actually applied in a very tiny two PC network.

Introduction to Subnetting
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Introduction to Subnetting, which is the continuation of our course on network layer addressing. Our goals in this module are to talk about Classless Inter Domain Routing, which we call CIDR. We're going to talk about how to build a subnet calculator and review IP address types that we covered in our previous module. At that point, I'm going to introduce subnetting and we're going to go through a basic subnetting problem so that we can get an idea of what we're trying to accomplish with these exercises.

Subnetting Examples
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module, we're going to continue on with subnetting with some examples here. These are intended for you to practice. If you click on the exercise files, you'll be able to find a PDF document of all of these subnet problems in there. What I'm going to do then is walk through each one and how to solve it. Let's get started. I have seven subnetting examples that we're going to walk through. Let's start.

IPv6 Subnetting
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and this is IPv6 Subnetting. Now unlike IPv4 subnetting, IPv6 subnetting is actually surprisingly easy in my opinion. The big reason for that is we get to work with hexadecimal numbers instead of having to dive down deep into the binary. Let's look at our goals for this module. I want to review the IPv4 subnet mask, I want to introduce IPv6 subnetting, and then we're going to subnet some different spaces. The internet service providers will typically receive a /32 that they can individually subnet into spaces for companies that are their customers, which are typically /48s, which then an individual company can subnet each site using a /56, and with the /56, we'll see how we can generate a bunch of /64 addresses that we can apply to actual real networks in our organization.

Router Operation
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this module, we're going to discuss router operation. At this point, we've been stuck in this mathematics operation of binary and hexadecimal and masks and /notations and all this stuff and it seems like we've taken such a huge departure from the topic at hand, which is how do networks work. The tough part is that understanding the addressing is fundamental to understanding how the networks work, but during the learning process, it can get a little bit overwhelming. So I thought we'd take a little departure here and talk some about how routers operate and we can apply a little bit of the subnetting to see what's going on here. Here's our goals this module. Now what I want to do is take subnet 10. 0. 0. 0/24 and divide it into 2 networks. We're going to go apply those subnets to a network, a local area network, and then we're going to examine the behavior of a ping message on that network. Last, what I want to do is actually go in and demonstrate that network. Now this is only the second course of this CCNA series, so we have not yet learned how to configure the router, so I'm going to configure the router for you. We're just going to observe the behavior. In the next course, what we'll do there is we'll learn how to put all these addresses on the router and get the router configured properly. For the time being, let's move into subnetting 10. 0. 0. 0 into 2 networks.

Variable Length Subnet Masking (VLSM)
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module is Variable Length Subnet Masking or VLSM. What's special about VLSM relative to subnetting? Actually, nothing. It's just a different method of calculating subnets that much more efficient and allows us to have more than one mask when we're doing subnetting. Our goals this module are to go through two separate VLSM problems and see how to solve them.

Check Your Knowledge
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's wrap up all this binary and hexadecimal of addressing with the Check Your Knowledge section and we can try applying all the information you learned to a series of problems that you might see on the CCNA, and even if you don't see them on the CCNA, these are going to be incredibly valuable for you in troubleshooting and supporting IP networks. Our goals this module are to review some IPv4 address problems, as well as some IPv6 address problems.