Description
Course info
Rating
(19)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 13, 2017
Duration
3h 4m
Description

Learn how to make use of dedicated AMD modules that are reusable and easier to maintain than traditional large JavaScript libraries. This course, JavaScript Asynchronous Module Definition (AMD) Explained, starts with a simple web project that grows into a comprehensive pattern suitable for use in your own projects. Along the way, you'll learn how to refactor your legacy JavaScript libraries into AMD modules as well as how to develop new modules that remain decoupled from each other. Developers that are new to AMD will often encounter two frustrating errors: "Define not defined" and "Mismatched anonymous define()". You'll find a full description of each error and how to address them. By the end of this course, you'll know how to write modules from scratch, refactor legacy libraries to use modular patterns, and use system events to pass data between modules.

About the author
About the author

Kevin is a lifelong learner with over 30 years in the IT industry. He works on web and mobile applications as well as the databases and web services to support them. With a gift for learning new languages, he is able to rapidly apply his broad experience in new environments.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, everyone. My name is Kevin Murray and welcome to my course, JavaScript Asynchronous Module Definition Explained. I'm a seasoned developer with a passion for reusable and reliable code. In this course we explore ways to make effective use of asynchronous modules loaded with RequireJS. Instead of rehashing the same examples found elsewhere, we create a simple website that will transform as we learn how to apply modular techniques. Some of the major topics we will cover include: using RequireJS to load modules in a website, using modules to alleviate the use of global namespace variables, using non-modular legacy libraries in a modular website, making use of modules in a decoupled manner. By the end of this course you'll know how to write modules from scratch, refactor legacy libraries to use modular patterns, and use system events to pass data between modules. Before beginning this course you should be familiar with website construction using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. jQuery is used throughout this course, but it is not a requirement for making use of modules or even following along with this course. I invite you to join me on this journey to learn modular programming patterns with the JavaScript Asynchronous Module Definition Explained course at Pluralsight.