Enterprise LAN Switching for Cisco CCNA 200-125/200-105

Providing redundant layer 2 networks is important in order to provide a resilient and reliable network. This course will show you how to do that.
Course info
Rating
(20)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 16, 2017
Duration
2h 48m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(20)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 16, 2017
Duration
2h 48m
Description

Understanding how Ethernet works in an enterprise environment is one of the most common skills required by a network engineer. In this course, Enterprise LAN Switching for Cisco CCNA 200-125/200-105, you will learn about creating redundant layer 2 networks with spanning tree protocol and rapid spanning tree protocol. Next, you'll learn about building redundant links between switches using EtherChannel, understanding how VLAN trunking protocol works. Finally, this course will wrap up by examining switch stacking with Cisco's stackwise technology. By the end of this course, you will be able to design implement redundant layer 2 networks that can converge in less than a second, as well as increase the bandwidth between switch uplinks using EtherChannel.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course Enterprise LAN. I'm a network engineer with 20 years' experience of building and managing enterprise networks and teaching people about them. Understanding how Ethernet works in an enterprise environment is one of the most common skills required by a network engineer. In this course, we'll learn about creating redundant Layer 2 networks using Spanning Tree Protocol and Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, we'll build redundant links between our switches using EtherChannel, and understand how VLAN Trunking Protocol works and why we might not want to use it. Additionally, we're going to examine stacking switches using Cisco's StackWise technology in cables. By the end of this course, you will be able to design and implement redundant Layer 2 networks that can converge in less than a second, as well as increase the bandwidth between switch uplinks using EtherChannel. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with Cisco Catalyst switch configuration, 802. 1q trunk operation, and access port operation. All of these can be learned about in the previous videos in this CCNA series. From here, you should feel comfortable moving onto the WAN Technologies course for the CCNA 200-125 exam. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn building Layer 2 redundant networks with the Enterprise LAN course at Pluralsight.

Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Enterprise LAN Switching for the Cisco CCNA 200-125 and 200-105 exams. Now that 200-105 exam, that is the ICND2 exam. That will be the exam that you would take to complete your CCNA should you have already taken your 100-105 exam, which would earn you the CCENT certification. Let's start off talking about enterprise LAN switching by discussing Spanning Tree Protocol, which was a critical protocol used in LAN switching. Our goals this module are to introduce the need for Spanning Tree Protocol. We're going to talk about STP operation and a lot of the vocabulary that we need to understand Spanning Tree Protocol, and then we'll dive into a demonstration of spanning tree using three switches, and we'll make some predictions about how those switches will behave when we have a Layer 2 loop inside of our network.

PerVLAN Spanning Tree and Rapid Spanning Tree Protocols
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module, we're going to talk about Per-VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol and Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol. This is PVST+ and RSTP+. These are two Cisco proprietary implementations of Spanning Tree Protocol. Our goals this module are to describe Per-VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol. We're going to demonstrate changing the priorities on separate VLANs so that we can see that each VLAN in our spanning tree uses a different BPDU and different calculation. We're also going to look at Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, or RSTP. And then we're going to implement RSTP on our switches.

EtherChannel
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this module, we're going to discuss EtherChannel. EtherChannel is another mechanism to provide redundancy between Layer 2 switches. Let's take a look at what's going on with this. Our goals this module are to describe EtherChannel. We're going to understand the EtherChannel control protocols. We're going to implement EtherChannel and then do some troubleshooting.

VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP)
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module, we're going to talk about VLAN Trunking Protocol, or VTP. Now in my experience, I have never seen a protocol like VTP where engineers are incredibly divided about its use. What I've seen is that engineers will either really embrace VTP and want to use it and enable it everywhere, or you'll engineers that say that is the most dangerous protocol in networking, and I should never, ever, ever, ever use it. I tend to fall in that later camp where we should never use VTP. It's very easy to configure trunk links and manage them, in my opinion. And using VTP has a very dangerous consequence to it that can easily shut your entire network down all at once, and we don't to have that happen. Now I don't want you to think that because I think VTP is dangerous and we shouldn't use it that it's something that we should never use. It is up to the organization and the risks that that organization wants to take as to whether they use VTP or not. Let's take a look at what it is and how it works. So our goals this module are going to be to describe the operation and see what it's function is. We're going to look at the different VTP modes that our switches can operate in and what purpose they have. We're going to look at the drawbacks of VTP by looking at the VTP database revision number. And then last, we're going to implement and troubleshoot some VTP. Hopefully by the end of this you'll see that VTP is a really nifty protocol, but it's one that may be too dangerous to use in a production environment.

Cisco Switch Stacking
Well, how about if we change the topic here and talk about something less controversial and messy than VTP, which is Cisco Switch Stacking. This is called StackWise from Cisco, and what we do here is we're able to take multiple separate switches and combine them into one switch without setting up any trunk links. Our goals this module, which is a very short one, is to describe switch stacking. We're going to list some of the requirements for switch stacking, and then we're going to implement a switch stack.

Check Your Knowledge
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's wrap up Enterprise LAN with this Check Your Knowledge section so we can apply what we've learned throughout this course. Our goals this module are to look at some additional Spanning Tree Protocol examples. Instead of doing just a three switch network and making some predictions about where the network will block, we're going to add another switch in there, as well as some additional links and see how spanning tree will behave. Also we're going to look at Layer 2 versus Layer 3 redundancy in a network. Having Layer 2 redundancy is nice, although we'll able to see that Layer 3 redundancy is a bit more efficient. Next we're going to do an implementation of two of our protocols that we looked at separately. We're going to implement them together in one single network and use EtherChannel links to build a Layer 2 loop so we can investigate spanning tree and see how spanning tree and EtherChannel interact together. And then last we're going to take a look at some features that can enhance the spanning tree process, especially for end users by taking a look at PortFast and BPDU guard.