C# Fundamentals with C# 5.0

C# Fundamentals with C# 5.0 is designed to give you everything you need to become a productive C# developer on the .NET platform.
Course info
Rating
(5051)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 28, 2014
Duration
6h 15m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(5051)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 28, 2014
Duration
6h 15m
Description

Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight! My name is Scott Allen, and I want to give you a quick overview of my course, C# Fundamentals with C# 5.0. It’s designed to help you get everything you need to become a productive C# developer on the .NET platform, and covers things like the syntax of C#, which is similar to Java, JavaScript, and C++, classes and objects in C#, and types and assemblies. Along the way, you’ll be using Visual Studio and the object oriented programming paradigm. When you're done, you'll feel comfortable reading and writing C# code in your own applications. To get the most from this course, you should be comfortable with fundamental programming concepts like loops and branching. I look forward to working with you on C# Fundamentals with C# 5.0, here at Pluralsight.

About the author
About the author

Scott has over 15 years of experience in commercial software development and is a frequent speaker at national conferences, and local user groups. Scott is a Microsoft MVP and has authored books on several Microsoft technologies, including ASP.NET, C#, and Windows Workflow.

More from the author
More courses by Scott Allen
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, this is Scott Allen, and welcome to my course on the C# programming language. I've been using the C# language for over 15 years at this point, because I love working in C#, and I want to show you all the great features of this language so that you will love it too. In the course, we'll work on building some simple applications and focusing on different areas of the language, like how to use classes, how to write methods and properties, and how to raise and handle events. I'll also give you some tips on how to keep your code readable, and tell you about common conventions that you'll see in day-to-day programming with C#. We'll also be looking at how to handle errors in your program, and of course I'll show you a few features of Visual Studio too. It will be fun for you to follow along. By the end of the course, you'll feel comfortable reading and writing C# code in your own applications. I do expect that you have some programming experience before you start this course. Ideally, you'll feel comfortable with concepts like loops and branching in programming. I'll show you how to write loops and branches in C#, but the course will definitely be easier if you know some of these fundamental programming concepts already, and if not, there are plenty of courses on Pluralsight. com to help you get started programming as an absolute beginner.

Introduction to C#
Hi. This is Scott Allen and this module is the first module of a course designed to give you everything you should know about the C# programming language. In this first module I want to spend some time showing you the environment and tools you'll be working with and allow you to get everything setup and installed to write your first simple program. C# is a wonderful and popular programming language and you can use it to write programs that run on tablets, on phones, on webservers, and desktops. We'll start to talk about the syntax of the C# language and the different types of programs that you can write, but before all the fun can begin we do need to install some software to help create our C# programs, so we'll get started right away.

Classes and Objects in C#
Hi. This is Scott Allen and this module is about classes in C#. Classes allow us to model the world around us in software. We can create custom classes to represent purchase orders, automobile parts, employees, accounts, spaceships in a game, anything you need to write software about, you can create a set of C# classes to help. In this module we'll talk about the relationship between classes and objects and start to learn how you can use C# as an object oriented programming language.

Types and Assemblies
Hi. This is Scott Allen and this module is about the different types in C#. Specifically, I want to make sure that you know how every C# type falls into one of two categories. Every type is either a reference type or a value type and it's important to understand how these different types behave. We will look at reference types and value types and then we'll also see how types are packaged into files we call assemblies. All this and more in this third module of the course.

Members: Methods, Events, and Properties
Hi. This is Scott Allen and in this module we're going to look at the members that you can attach to a type in the C# programing language. This includes some familiar concepts that we've looked at before, concepts like methods and fields, but we are going to go into much deeper detail on these concepts, as well as introduce some new pieces, so welcome to this module focused on methods, events, and properties in C#.

Flow Control
Hi. This is Scott Allen of Pluralsight and in this module we're going to look at flow control in C#. Specifically, we're going to be looking at the keywords and constructs available in the language to perform branching, to iterate across collections, to jump to different points in an execution path, and finally, we'll look at error handling. That is, how to throw exceptions, how to catch exceptions, and how to create new custom exceptions.

Object Oriented Programming
Hi. This is Scott Allen and this is the final module in this C# course. In this module I want to give you the concepts and the syntax for object-oriented programing in C#. C# is an object-oriented programing language, although you can do more than just object-oriented programing in C#, but I talk about some of those topics in part two of this course, but in this module of this course we're going to look at inheritance and polymorphism, how to use abstract classes and interfaces, all this and more in the final module of part one.