Cisco CCNA: Introduction to Networking

Part 1 of 4 in the Cisco CCENT - ICND1 (100-101) series. You will learn the fundamental concepts of networking, and then immediately apply this knowledge to the configuration of a router and switch.
Course info
Rating
(1216)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 26, 2013
Duration
3h 38m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(1216)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 26, 2013
Duration
3h 38m
Description

Part 1 of 4 in the Cisco CCENT - ICND1 (100-101) series. In this course, you will learn the fundamental concepts of networking, and then immediately apply this knowledge to the configuration of a router and switch. By the end of the course, you will have enough knowledge to set up a network environment that has multiple subnets over multiple virtual LANs (VLANs), use network address translation (NAT) to connect to the Internet, and hand out IP addresses automatically. Additionally, you will take a deep dive into IP addressing, using binary, to really gain a fundamental understanding of how endpoints are addressed. All you need as a prerequisite is a willingness to learn and basic computer skills.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Network Protocols
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes and you're watching Introduction to Network Protocols. Now what I want to talk about in this video is how we actually using network protocols to do all of the tasks that we do on a day to day basis when we're using the public internet or using our PC in general. And if we take a look at network protocols, there is a literal sea of protocols out there and I've put a few of them out here and we're going to be covering all of these protocols at some level throughout this course, Some we're going to spend much more time on, others we're going to spend much less time on. But ultimately a network protocol is nothing more than a set of rules. So a set of rules that an application can then use in order to transfer data from one device to a different device and the protocol we use is going to be dependent upon the data that we have to transfer. We often see a lot of overlap here, however, each one of these protocols was written for a very specific purpose. And as we make progress through this course, we are going to see how these network protocols are actually implemented.