Application Layer Protocols for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105

Keep your network running and help your business run more effectively. In this course, you will examine fundamental application layer protocols an their operation including, HTTP, FTP, DNS, DHCP, NTP, and Syslog.
Course info
Rating
(21)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 15, 2016
Duration
2h 45m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(21)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 15, 2016
Duration
2h 45m
Description

In a business, the entire purpose of the data network is to make the business function more effectively through the use of software applications. In this course, Application Layer Protocols for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105, you will examine critical application layer protocols that both help keep the network running, as well as allow end users to easily access resources on the internal network as well as the Internet. Then, you'll learn about the application layer protocols that assist engineers in maintaining the function of a network efficiently, like DHCP, DNS, Syslog, and NTP. Engineers use these protocols to maintain networks, and create an effective user experience. Finally, you'll learn about the other application layer protocols, like HTTP and FTP, and how they are used by the users themselves to browse to websites or download files. By the end of this course, you will have the foundational knowledge of DHCP, DNS, FTP, HTTP, NTP, and Syslog. You will even learn how to investigate a strategy to mitigate rouge DHCP servers from attacking your network.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my a name is Ross Bagurdes and welcome to my course Application Layer Protocols. I'm a network engineer with 20 years experience building and managing enterprise networks and teaching people about them. Building a data network is a somewhat useless task, unless we use it to pass data between devices. To pass this data we use application layer protocols, like HTTP, SSH or Telnet. Additionally we use a group of somewhat quite protocols that work behind the scenes to make our network operate successfully. In this course we will learn about client server operation, we'll discuss HTTP clients and servers, we'll look at Telnet and SSH, unencrypted and encrypted communication. We're going to examine DHCP operation and look at a rogue DHCP server and how we can mitigate a tax from rogue DHCP servers. We'll also look at DNS, Domain Name System, which is the telephone directory for the internet. By the end of this course, you'll know how to troubleshoot DHCP and DNS issues on work stations, and before beginning this course you should be familiar with TCP and UDP, IP addressing and network operation, which can be learned from the previous videos in this CCNA series. From here you should feel comfortable diving into access control lists and the rest of the courses in the CCNA series. I hope you join me on this journey to learn about HTTP, DNS, and DHCP with application layer protocols at Pluralsight.

Syslog and Network Time Protocol (NTP)
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module is Syslog and Network Time Protocol or NTP. Our goals this module are going to be to take a look and discuss Syslog, why we use it and how it works with a Syslog server. We're going to introduce Network Time Protocol or NTP, then we're going to implement NTP in addition to implementing Syslog.

Domain Name System (DNS)
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module is Domain Name System or DNS. What DNS is is effectively the telephone book for the internet. It allows us to take a very simple name, like www. Pluralsight. com, and resolve it into an IP address that we can use in our packet header, so we can get traffic back and forth between Pluralsight and your work station. Our goals this module to determine how DNS works are going to be to examine the Uniform Resource Locator or URL, effectively those are the words that you type into your web browser to get to the website that you want to go to, www. Pluralsight. com is a URL. We're going to look at how that URL is used in the domain name system and examine how DNS operates to resolve that host name and domain name into an IP address and then last, we're going to use nslookup to examine how DNS actually does this resolution of a name to an IP address.

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module we're going to talk about Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol or DHCP. The goals for this module are to describe DHCP operation and why we use DHCP. We're going to implement DHCP on a router and then we're going to describe what the DHCP helper address is or an IP helper address that we can use on a router, and then I will demonstrate using this helper address.

DHCP Snooping
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's continue on talking about DHCP and look at a security measure that we have called DHCP snooping that we can implement on Cisco switches. DHCP snooping is a little bit of an unusual word, but it literally means what it says in that we're going to snoop in on the DHCP's traffic as it flows through the switch. So we're going to first describe why we need this and I want to describe what a rogue DHCP server is. Once we do that, we'll describe how DHCP snooping can prevent that.

Check Your Knowledge
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's wrap up this course about application layer protocols with a check your knowledge section that I'm calling "the network is down". And the network is down is something that your users are going to say to you often regardless of what the situation is, oftentimes what the user means by the network is down is that when they open up a web browser nothing comes up, and at this point in our education about networking, we should know that the network is down is too loose of a statement to describe pretty much any situation unless the network is literally down. So there could be all kinds of issues giving the user the experience of a network down. Let's take a look at some scenarios on the network is down.